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Saving the Sagebrush Sea: An Imperiled Western Legacy

Nearly 350 plant and animal species depend on sagebrush habitat for their survival.
 


 

Western Public Lands

conservation

Sportsmen Release Report on Responsible Energy Development

Date: 
Sun, 08/13/2017

A new report by sportsmen focuses on smart-from-the-start energy development. Image: EcoFlight

DENVER --  A new report released by the Sportsmen for Responsible Energy Development coalition and endorsed by several fishing and hunting businesses urges smart-from-the-start planning, public engagement and consideration of the long-term impacts on fishing and hunting opportunities. The report, Lessons Learned: A Blueprint for Securing our Energy Future While Preserving America’s Sporting Heritage,” features examples of where oil and gas production was well-planned, where it wasn’t and where the potential remains to do things right.

As the Trump administration explores ways to streamline and speed up approval of leases and drilling on public lands, it’s more important than ever to promote responsible energy development and ensure that high-quality opportunities to hunt and fish on public lands are sustained long into the future.

 

NWF, affiliates: Attacks on sage-grouse conservation don't belong in defense bill

Date: 
Sun, 05/22/2016

Image: USFWS/Mountain-Prairie Region

In a repeat of last year, the U.S. House has passed the National Defense Authorization Act with unrelated environmental and wildlife provisions, including one that would block federal plans to conserve sage-grouse and its habitat -- the sagebrush steppe, which supports more than 350 species. The bill passed May 18 also contains language that would undermine the goal of keeping invasive species out the Great Lakes; block Endangered Species Act protections for the lesser prairie chicken; and transfer more half of the Desert National Wildlife Refuge in Nevada to the Air Force even though the military hasn't requested the transfer. 

“Weakening protections for our nation’s fish and wildlife in a piece of legislation intended to strengthen national defense is simply unacceptable,” said Collin O’Mara, president and CEO of the National Wildlife Federation. 

 

Sportsmen rally for sage grouse and an iconic Western landscape

Date: 
Tue, 09/08/2015

Conserving sage grouse and their habitat will benefit hundreds of species. Image: Judith Kohler

DENVER  – With a decision looming on whether to federally protect the greater sage-grouse, Western sportsmen and women are reaffirming their support for plans to conserve the bird and the sagebrush lands that support hundreds of species, local economies, hunting and other outdoor traditions.

The National Wildlife Federation and members of its affiliates support conservation efforts by private landowners and state and federal agencies to rebuild sage grouse numbers and head off the need to protect the bird under the federal Endangered Species Act. A new fact sheet, “Saving the Sagebrush Sea: An Imperiled Western Legacy,” by NWF highlights wildlife dependent on the sagebrush steppe and sportsmen’s thoughts about the iconic Western landscape.

"The Bureau of Land Management’s sage-grouse plans unveiled in May along with the state plans "can be a lifeline for the species,” said Aaron Kindle, NWF's Western sportsmen's campaign manager.  “Sportsmen and women should get behind this broad-range plan. We have an obligation to ensure the future of sage grouse and the uniquely American landscape they call home, as well as the future of conservation in the West.”

Montana legislator sponsors resolution to keep public lands public

Date: 
Thu, 02/19/2015

In response to overwhelming public demand for greater protection for Montana’s public lands, state Rep. Ed Lieser,  D-Whitefish, has introduced House Joint Resolution 19, which expresses formal opposition to efforts to claim, take over, litigate, or sell federal lands in Montana. A handful of legislators have been pushing for the state to take over federally managed public lands in Montana. Earlier this week, about 500 people from across the state packed the state capitol to support keeping public lands in public hands and oppose attempted land grabs.

 “We want our elected officials to protect and manage these lands for future generations, not hold frivolous philosophical debates,”  said Dave Chadwick, Montana Wildlife Federation executive director.

 

 

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