Take action for public lands.
 

 

 

 
Saving the Sagebrush Sea: An Imperiled Western Legacy

Nearly 350 plant and animal species depend on sagebrush habitat for their survival.
 


 

Western Public Lands

greater sage-grouse

Colorado Sportsmen Speak Out For Sage-Grouse Plans

Date: 
Tue, 11/07/2017

Colorado sportsmen and women want to see sage-grouse conservation plans proceed. Image: NWF

CRAIG, Colo. – Colorado sportsmen and women and wildlife advocates are urging members of the public to speak out in support of plans designed to conserve greater sage-grouse and sagebrush lands. The Bureau of Land Management scheduled an open house Nov. 8 in Craig, the only public forum planned in Colorado on proposed changes to the sage-grouse plans.

The sagebrush steppe, found in 11 Western states, supports elk, mule deer, pronghorns and many other species as well as sage-grouse, Colorado Wildlife Federation Executive Director Suzanne O’Neill notes. 

“Our public lands and wildlife are fundamental to Colorado's lifestyle. The efforts to save the greater sage-grouse will sustain not only the bird but a lot of other wildlife Coloradans care about,” O’Neill says

NWF, Affiliates: Sage-Grouse Order Could Jeopardize Conservation Plans

Date: 
Wed, 06/07/2017

A secretarial order on greater sage-grouse conservation plans could derail years of work. Image: FWS/Tom Koerner

By Judith Kohler

WASHINGTON  – The order by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to review and perhaps significantly alter the greater sage-grouse conservation plans runs the risk of derailing a years-long effort to save the bird and a landscape that supports 350 other species, the National Wildlife Federation said.

The 60-day review by an Interior Department team could upend plans that are based on science, conditions in individual Western states, and the overall threats to sage grouse, including the loss and degradation of its habitat, while allowing for responsible energy development.

“The Secretarial Order to review and perhaps alter the collaborative conservation plans could unnecessarily derail this multi-state effort and jeopardize not only an iconic species, but the sagebrush steppe that supports more than 350 wildlife species, including mule deer and pronghorn, provides countless opportunities for hunters, anglers, and outdoor enthusiasts, and supports more than $1 billion in annual economic benefits for local communities," said Collin O’Mara, the National Wildlife Federation’s president and CEO. 

NWF, affiliates: Attacks on sage-grouse conservation don't belong in defense bill

Date: 
Sun, 05/22/2016

Image: USFWS/Mountain-Prairie Region

In a repeat of last year, the U.S. House has passed the National Defense Authorization Act with unrelated environmental and wildlife provisions, including one that would block federal plans to conserve sage-grouse and its habitat -- the sagebrush steppe, which supports more than 350 species. The bill passed May 18 also contains language that would undermine the goal of keeping invasive species out the Great Lakes; block Endangered Species Act protections for the lesser prairie chicken; and transfer more half of the Desert National Wildlife Refuge in Nevada to the Air Force even though the military hasn't requested the transfer. 

“Weakening protections for our nation’s fish and wildlife in a piece of legislation intended to strengthen national defense is simply unacceptable,” said Collin O’Mara, president and CEO of the National Wildlife Federation. 

 

NWF, affiliates: Let sage-grouse conservation plans work

Date: 
Wed, 04/27/2016

Greater sage-grouse number fewer than a half million across the West. Image: NWF

DENVER -- The National Wildlife Federation and its Western state affiliates strongly oppose a provision in the defense bill that would do nothing to improve national security but would derail efforts to conserve the greater sage-grouse and the sagebrush steppe.

In a letter sent April 26 to the House Committee on Armed Services, the organizations detailed the problems with a section in the National Defense Authorization Act that would block plans to conserve sage grouse across the West. 

The organizations noted the conservation plans approved by the Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service were developed with input from states and private landowners. 

"We simply cannot afford any roadblocks, especially with all the work, collaboration and momentum we have toward conserving this iconic bird and the sagebrush landscape, which is so important to our local economies and activities our communities rely on, like ranching and recreation," says Joy Bannon, field director for the Wyoming Wildlife Federation.

 

Pages