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Nearly 350 plant and animal species depend on sagebrush habitat for their survival.
 


 

Western Public Lands

Idaho Wildlife Federation

NWF, affiliates: Let sage-grouse conservation plans work

Date: 
Wed, 04/27/2016

Greater sage-grouse number fewer than a half million across the West. Image: NWF

DENVER -- The National Wildlife Federation and its Western state affiliates strongly oppose a provision in the defense bill that would do nothing to improve national security but would derail efforts to conserve the greater sage-grouse and the sagebrush steppe.

In a letter sent April 26 to the House Committee on Armed Services, the organizations detailed the problems with a section in the National Defense Authorization Act that would block plans to conserve sage grouse across the West. 

The organizations noted the conservation plans approved by the Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service were developed with input from states and private landowners. 

"We simply cannot afford any roadblocks, especially with all the work, collaboration and momentum we have toward conserving this iconic bird and the sagebrush landscape, which is so important to our local economies and activities our communities rely on, like ranching and recreation," says Joy Bannon, field director for the Wyoming Wildlife Federation.

 

IWF adds to 70-plus-year track record of wins for sportsmen, conservation

Date: 
Thu, 02/04/2016

Incoming Idaho Wildlife Federation President Kahle Becker, left, and Michael Gibson, former IWF executive director. Image: Lew Carpenter

By Lew Carpenter, NWF Regional Representative

In 1938, the Idaho Wildlife Federation (IWF) celebrated one of its first victories when it organized and circulated petitions and lobbied for the passage of an initiative establishing a professional Fish and Game Department and Fish and Game Commission.  For more than 75 years IWF has consistently delivered legislative victories for the benefit of sportsmen, sportswomen, wildlife and habitat.

Last year, IWF’s work on behalf of sportsmen and women and conservation paid off when the Boulder-White Clouds area secured congressional wilderness protection. The designation came on the heels of IWF’s strong leadership and advocacy to protect that special place through monument status, which ultimately lead to the wilderness bill. IWF led the charge through the Sportsmen for Boulder-White Clouds campaign.

“There is still work to be done in protecting the East Fork of the Salmon watershed,” Michael Gibson said. “The East Fork is the highest spawning habitat for salmon and steelhead found anywhere in the world." 

Sportsmen, outdoor enthusiasts celebrate newly designated wilderness in Idaho

Date: 
Sun, 08/09/2015

 

 

Highly prized fish and wildlife habitat is part of a new wilderness area in Idaho. Image: Idaho Wildlife Federation

Some of Idaho’s best high-alpine fish and wildlife habit now has permanent protection. The Sawtooth National Recreation Area and Jerry Peak Wilderness Additions Act was signed into law Aug. 7, setting aside 275,665 acres. The wilderness bill, long championed by Idaho Rep. Mike Simpson, was signed just three days after the Senate unanimously approved it. 

“On behalf of the many Idaho sportsmen and women who treasure this area, I want to thank Congressman Simpson for his tireless efforts to provide wilderness protections to the Boulder-White Clouds."~ Michael Gibson, Idaho Wildlife Federation executive director.

Sportsmen, outdoor enthusiasts rally across the West for public lands

Date: 
Wed, 03/11/2015

About 100 hunters, anglers, wildlife watchers and outdoor enthusiasts rallied on the steps of the Colorado Capitol. Image: Judith Kohler

By Judith Kohler

The rumble heard in late January when hundreds of people crowded into the New Mexico statehouse to demand that public lands stay in public hands has only grown louder and deeper, spreading throughout the Rocky Mountain West.

Sportsmen and women have joined with hikers, mountain bikers, horseback riders, paddlers, wildlife watchers and others to take their fight for American public lands to the steps or lobbies of statehouses from Santa Fe to Carson City. They are meeting one-on-one with legislators, writing letters to the editor and talking to the media. 

As hunters and anglers fight efforts at the state level to dismantle our outdoor heritage attacks are occurring at the federal level, including proposals to gut the Antiquities Act and sell public lands. 

 
Idaho sportsmen and women set up camp on the grounds of the state capitol in Boise.

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