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Saving the Sagebrush Sea: An Imperiled Western Legacy

Nearly 350 plant and animal species depend on sagebrush habitat for their survival.
 


 

Western Public Lands

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Colorado Sportsmen Speak Out For Sage-Grouse Plans

Date: 
Tue, 11/07/2017

Colorado sportsmen and women want to see sage-grouse conservation plans proceed. Image: NWF

CRAIG, Colo. – Colorado sportsmen and women and wildlife advocates are urging members of the public to speak out in support of plans designed to conserve greater sage-grouse and sagebrush lands. The Bureau of Land Management scheduled an open house Nov. 8 in Craig, the only public forum planned in Colorado on proposed changes to the sage-grouse plans.

The sagebrush steppe, found in 11 Western states, supports elk, mule deer, pronghorns and many other species as well as sage-grouse, Colorado Wildlife Federation Executive Director Suzanne O’Neill notes. 

“Our public lands and wildlife are fundamental to Colorado's lifestyle. The efforts to save the greater sage-grouse will sustain not only the bird but a lot of other wildlife Coloradans care about,” O’Neill says

Sportsmen Release Report on Responsible Energy Development

Date: 
Sun, 08/13/2017

A new report by sportsmen focuses on smart-from-the-start energy development. Image: EcoFlight

DENVER --  A new report released by the Sportsmen for Responsible Energy Development coalition and endorsed by several fishing and hunting businesses urges smart-from-the-start planning, public engagement and consideration of the long-term impacts on fishing and hunting opportunities. The report, Lessons Learned: A Blueprint for Securing our Energy Future While Preserving America’s Sporting Heritage,” features examples of where oil and gas production was well-planned, where it wasn’t and where the potential remains to do things right.

As the Trump administration explores ways to streamline and speed up approval of leases and drilling on public lands, it’s more important than ever to promote responsible energy development and ensure that high-quality opportunities to hunt and fish on public lands are sustained long into the future.

 

NWF, Affiliates: Sage-Grouse Order Could Jeopardize Conservation Plans

Date: 
Wed, 06/07/2017

A secretarial order on greater sage-grouse conservation plans could derail years of work. Image: FWS/Tom Koerner

By Judith Kohler

WASHINGTON  – The order by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke to review and perhaps significantly alter the greater sage-grouse conservation plans runs the risk of derailing a years-long effort to save the bird and a landscape that supports 350 other species, the National Wildlife Federation said.

The 60-day review by an Interior Department team could upend plans that are based on science, conditions in individual Western states, and the overall threats to sage grouse, including the loss and degradation of its habitat, while allowing for responsible energy development.

“The Secretarial Order to review and perhaps alter the collaborative conservation plans could unnecessarily derail this multi-state effort and jeopardize not only an iconic species, but the sagebrush steppe that supports more than 350 wildlife species, including mule deer and pronghorn, provides countless opportunities for hunters, anglers, and outdoor enthusiasts, and supports more than $1 billion in annual economic benefits for local communities," said Collin O’Mara, the National Wildlife Federation’s president and CEO. 

Hunting, Fishing Businesses Unite in Support of National Monuments

Date: 
Tue, 05/09/2017

 

New Mexico's Rio Grande del Norte is one of the national monuments under review by the Interior Department. Image: BLM/Bob Wick

Hunting, Fishing Businesses Unite in Support of National Monuments

WASHINGTON – More than 100 hunting and fishing business owners and sporting organizations sent a letter May 9 to Congress to show their support for national monuments and the responsible use of the Antiquities Act.

The letter is part of a larger effort to demonstrate the important role national monuments and the Antiquities Act play not only to small businesses and rural economies but also to hunters and anglers all across the country. Business owners met with decision makers in Washington to emphasize the value of public lands and national monuments to the outdoor industry.

“As someone who has helped develop the outdoor industry in Colorado and watched it grow into an economic powerhouse, I am concerned by current efforts both to curtail national monuments and weaken the Antiquities Act itself,” said Jim Bartschi, president of Scott Fly Rods in Montrose, Colorado. 

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